VIRTUAL AUTHOR EVENT
IN CONVERSATION WITH AVIVA CHOMSKY

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz: Not a Nation of Immigrants
6:30PM (9:30 ET) FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
LOCATION: LIVE ON ZOOM



You can support Changing Hands by purchasing the book via Eventbrite below, or by contributing what you can. A suggested contribution of $10 or $20—whatever you can afford—will help keep our virtual event series sustainable and accessible to all. Thank you!

You'll receive the Zoom link by email within 24 hours of the event's start time. For information about participating in virtual events, see our FAQ page.
Book Cover
In Conversation with Aviva Chomsky

 
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz will be in conversation with Aviva Chomsky to discuss her new book.


ABOUT THE BOOK

Debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States
 

Whether in political debates or discussions about immigration around the kitchen table, many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, will say proudly that we are a nation of immigrants. In this bold new book, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz asserts this ideology is harmful and dishonest because it serves to mask and diminish the US’s history of settler colonialism, genocide, white supremacy, slavery, and structural inequality, all of which we still grapple with today.

She explains that the idea that we are living in a land of opportunity—founded and built by immigrants—was a convenient response by the ruling class and its brain trust to the 1960s demands for decolonialization, justice, reparations, and social equality. Moreover, Dunbar-Ortiz charges that this feel good‑-but inaccurate--story promotes a benign narrative of progress, obscuring that the country was founded in violence as a settler state, and imperialist since its inception.

While some of us are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, others are descendants of white settlers who arrived as colonizers to displace those who were here since time immemorial, and still others are descendants of those who were kidnapped and forced here against their will. This paradigm shifting new book from the highly acclaimed author of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States charges that we need to stop believing and perpetuating this simplistic and a historical idea and embrace the real (and often horrific) history of the United States.

*Our Zoom events are password-protected with wait rooms enabled. The password is entered automatically by clicking the event link when logged in to a Zoom account. We'll admit guests shortly before 6:30PM and throughout the event. If you join late, please be patient—we'll admit you when we see you.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma in a tenant farming family. She has been active in the international Indigenous movement for more than 4 decades and is known for her lifelong commitment to national and international social justice issues. Dunbar-Ortiz is the winner of the 2017 Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize, and is the author or editor of many books, including An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, a recipient of the 2015 American Book Award. She lives in San Francisco. Connect with her at reddirtsite.com or on Twitter @rdunbaro.

ABOUT THE MODERATOR
Aviva Chomsky is a professor of history and the coordinator of Latin American Studies at Salem State University. The author of several books including Undocumented“They Take Our Jobs!”,  and Central America's Forgotten History, Chomsky has been active in the Latin American solidarity and immigrants’ rights movements for over 30 years. She lives in Salem, Massachusetts.